Lagrange Point Famicom English Hack

A few posts back I documented converting a Famicom game (Princess Tomato and the Salad Kingdom) to use the English translation. Since that went so well, I finally had the courage to try the game I really wanted to do: Lagrange Point. I think it’s fair for me to do a little background on this incredible game. Lagrange Point was developed by Konami and released in Japan for the Nintendo Famicom on April 26, 1991 (two days before I was born!). It’s a totally rad space opera rpg with some unique game mechanics that make it quite fun. It also had some audio features that I’ll go into more detail about. The Famicom supported “expansion audio”. That is, game cartridges were able to have their own sound chips to expand what the Famicom was normally capable of making. Several games took advantage of this, such as Castlevania 3. In fact...

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Famicom English Conversion

Mid-Week Summer Project! Synopsys: In 1985 Nintendo released the Nintendo Entertainment System in North America to huge commercial success. This was particularly impressive due to the fact that the home video game market was in a slump caused by a market flood of cheaply made games and systems. Part of the reason the NES was such a success was that Nintendo marketed the console as a complete “home entertainment system” that was so much more than just a video game console. It wasn’t really, but the marketing paid off. That’s why it looks more like a VCR than a video game system, and the first release was even bundled with a robot! Two years earlier, Nintendo had dome something very similar in Japan by releasing the Family Computer, or as it’s more commonly known the Famicom. The two systems were essentially identical internally but had vastly different designs aesthetically. One...

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Android Wear/Moto 360 Review

Disclaimer: Below is a wall of rambling and poorly worded text. Don’t judge me TOO much… Just over a year ago, Google unveiled Android Wear, their version of Android specifically tailored for so-called “smart watches” or “wearables”. Among the first devices announced was the Moto 360. As the name implies, it was extremely notable due to it’s completely round display - something almost completely unheard of at the time (and even extremely uncommon today). Though the first two Android Wear devices launched on June 25, 2014 at Google’s I/O, the much anticipated Moto 360 wouldn’t be available until September 5. It seemed somewhat odd that the flagship smart watch wouldn’t be the first to arrive. It was announced at that same I/O that “everyone [there] whould receive their own Moto 360……when they are available…” Why wouldn’t Google just give everyone an LG G watch, since they were already available? The...

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The Interview: My Technical Interview That's Almost as Funny as a Seth Rogan Movie

I’ve been mulling over whether it would be productive to write this experience down or not. I ultimately came to the conclusion that it would not be productive. However, I am currently cramming for finals and cannot make myself study any more. So I figure writing this would be more productive than just refreshing my email over and over for the next two hours. Full disclosure: I don’t really have any valuable tips to give someone in a technical interview. Hopefully at least I can be an example of what not to do. It was Feb. 2013. I had just returned home from a two-year mission for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (Mormon). The only reason this is important is because I basically hadn’t touched a computer in two years. At least not in a programming/technical way. Not that I was very technical before that. My uncle...

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How To: Completely Erase the ROM of an EMS 64m USB Gameboy Cart

###Disclaimer: I am not an expert in Gameboy hardware to any extent, so take this with a grain of salt. Update 1: I neglected to mention there is an app for Android that will allow you to flash the cart using a USB OTG cable. I haven’t used that app, but it may be easier for some people than a command line unix utility. It looks like it only supports reading/writing savs though? Find it here. Update 2: I also neglected to mention that talented hacker MottZilla wrote (patched?) a menu app for Windows that lets you do multi rom and also have multiple savs. I haven’t used that either but it may be worth checking out. You can find his write up here. Recently, I’ve been playing around with my EMS 64m USB gabmeboy cartridge. The cart itself works well for what it is, but the flashing software is...

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